Service Dog Training

Time to seize that leash on “bogus” support dogs!



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It is really time to acquire a chunk out of “bogus” support dogs. They are a dangerous distraction to legitimate “operating” support dogs. They have not long gone by any sort of support dog training method and are only out in general public since their selfish homeowners do not want to leave their pet dogs at property.

2016 – Make sure you note…the “webinar” that I mention has been taken down as it is aged material now!!

25 comments

  1. I trained my own service dog and she still learning something new ..Better than any organization. Thanks for video

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  2. Im working on getting my dog trained to alert me of when i have anxiety and panic attacks

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  3. is Colton Wood's service dog, Nibbler, a fake service dog?

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  4. Guide dogs should always react to sounds. But they have all trained to ignore all distractions of every day life (other people, other dogs, interesting scents etc.)

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  5. Wow 25-50K I'm in the wrong business. I would love to see a "fake service dog" that people couldn't tell is fake with a small bit of education. My dogs would certainly pass for service dogs I have taken them into places and they ask me if they are service dogs I say no and they are astonished. Sadly dogs cannot be part of society and bad owners are to blame who let their dogs become hazardous to society and refuse to train.

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  6. Very well put…but the problem is getting worse. I have seen only a few legitimate service dogs and their behavior is so obviously learned…it is a wonderful thing to see. However, the current scam is now that people's pets are "emotional support animals" and obviously the legitimacy of this is impossible to determine since having one's pet with you is doubtlessly a calming experience regardless of how unnecessary it is. I saw a video with Henry Caville (the newest Superman) who was boarding a commercial plane with his vested "service dog". He was questioned about the but smiled and walked away…Really? That is the attitude that is now prevalent.

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  7. there is also self trained. dogs who are real service dogs doing real tasks.

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  8. What a well done informative video. As a guide dog puppy raiser, I am constantly being questioned and stared at as if my puppy in training were fake. So many selfish dog owners along with their pets are affecting the people that need them most. People have taken advantage of this law that was so hard to pass in the first place.

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  9. I had one of the fakers try to kill my service dog my poor dog hid under the bus seat while I used my leg to block the fakers attempts at getting my dog the bus driver did kick the faker off I just feel lucky my dog was small enough to hide under the seat she's around 50 pounds i'm a bit nervous about riding the bus now because of this 🙁  i'm just happy I was able to block the faker keeping it from harming my poor dog.

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  10. I cannot find the link to your webinar…. would you be able to post it again?

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  11. My dog isn't a fake service dog.  I have fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, bipolar, anxiety, panic attacks, post traumatic stress disorder.  What about these invisible illnesses that are so legitimate?  I fall apart emotionally and NEED my lab.  He is there to provide comfort, distraction from annoying stimuli, pain relief and anxiety relief.  I am collecting disability.  What is so wrong that I bought him a vest?  My psychiatrist at a world renown hospital is very happy for me.  Why not focus on true problems in society:  rape, assault, gunmen, terrorism.  I don't owe you any explinations.  

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  12. See with this, some service dogs are trained to focus on the 'distractions' to help their handler by alerting and blocking the distractions from their handler. I've gotten a lot of problem because my service dog becomes a barrier without me giving him a command, many people have used this and called him a fake service dog. But he is a service dog, he's doing his job on becoming a barrier and/or alerting me to the distraction.

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  13. I am a owner/trainer of my service dog in training a 11 month old Belgian malinois.  How do you feel about those of us who with the help of a private trainer are training our own service dog, because either we can't afford the price or our issues limit us  (as in my case I am Agoraphobic, and a panic attack can and has lead to a hospital visit) I do agree that there are some people who will always try to scam for personal and selfish reasons.  But not all of us who don't get our Service dog from a Service Dog Organization are bad like everything else it takes time to educate people that not all disabilities are visible and not everything can be cured by a pill.

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  14. Love the video! 

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  15. By law, a service animal is to be allowed unless it is unruly, which I'm sure most fake ones are not.
    Also, if it is a real service animal, the own usually won't let people pet them.

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  16. I was surprised to hear you state in your video that pets aren't allowed in businesses. I'm sure you meant that they aren't SUPPOSED to be! LOL

    Like most people with psychiatric disabilities, I've trained my own service dog. Unlike too many people with psychiatric disabilities, I've held my dog to the same standards of behavior as any other service dog, though because he's an adorable miniature schnoodle rather than a more typical service dog breed it hasn't been easy. No matter how I "dress" him, people ignore both patches and my pleas and make eye contact with, direct sounds and gestures towards, and even pet him without my permission. Even in a hospital setting when I stayed with my husband during a health crisis, he received so much attention from everyone from housekeeping staff to M.D.s that after 5 days and 4 nights, despite having had over two years of rigorous training, it took 2 weeks of solid retraining to reinforce that he neither solicits attention nor reacts inappropriately when he gets, or doesn't get, it. He's too friendly for his own good as it is! LOL

    In a perfect world, all owner-trainers would have access to service dog organizations that both trained their own dogs and assisted owner-trainers to train theirs to the point where the team could pass the most widely used public access test (that developed by, and for Assistance Dogs International), then administer it and certify the teams with their programs. But this ISN'T a perfect world, and as ADI fails to recognize the certification of owner-trainer teams unless they train under the direct supervision of a qualified representative of an ADI member organization for the required number of hours (which can take an absurdly long time and requires enough effort by the ADI-recognized trainers that their organizations must charge owner-trainers prohibitively high amounts for their services), most teams that could pass a PAT still wouldn't be certified as far as ADI is concerned. So few service dog organizations train psychiatric service dogs or work with PSD owner-trainers that certification, program- or ADI-recognized, isn't possible – yet those of us who so choose to do so still need to dress our dogs, so we do the best we can (I paid a dry cleaner that does alterations to sew 3 patches – a round one with a Stop sign in the middle and "I'm Cute I'm Working Do Not Pet" encircling it flanked by two rectangular ones that read "Anxiety Response Service Dog" and "Depression Alert Service Dog" onto an attractive functional vest called the Doodie Pack, and it's very attractive and professional-looking). Every online retailer with whom I've dealt is sure to warn prospective customers that using the vests, patches, etc. they sell to fraudulently represent a pet as a service animal violates both state and federal laws, and I believe it would be unfair to expect more of them than that.

    Wherever we go, I do my best to educate those in the business world about service dogs. A problem I've encountered more than once is caused by either actual or faux service dog handlers who ignore the implication they're perpetuating and show ID cards they've made, purchased, or received from service dog providers as "proof" that their dogs are service dogs. Having seen and accepted such legally unnecessary documentation, business owners and employees then erroneously believe they have the right to demand such documentation from all service dog handlers. They simply refuse to believe that all they can legally do is ask if my dog is a service dog I require due to a disability and what he's trained to do to assist me. I wish you'd make a video about THAT nightmare!! We've been asked to leave a family restaurant that's been a landmark for over 60 years, a national chain restaurant, and a local chain restaurant because I refused to proffer an ID card upon request. The manager of the last had the most creative reason for demanding one: the fact that so many others had offered them, he said, had created the "reasonable expectation" that everyone would! I told him he was welcome to call the police, as I was confident that his claim would be soundly debunked. I don't know if he did, but 20 tense minutes passed before my wonderful husband (who wouldn't dream of suggesting we just leave) and I were given menus. The manager of the landmark restaurant engaged is such outrageous behavior that I could have easily won a lawsuit (he first refused to allow me to be seated because I didn't have an ID card, then agreed to allow me to be seated as long as I brought one on my next visit, then told me he'd have to segregate us from other dinners in the back of the restaurant in case any of them was allergic to dogs, then, having failed to stop me from seating myself where I pleased and ordering, he came to my booth, leaned over to get very close, and questioned my ability to pay for my meal!!), but I instead opted to have a lawyer affiliated with the local chapter of a statewide advocacy organization for people with disabilities invite the manager to conduct a training seminar for all the staff with assistance from a local service dog organization instead, though he made it clear that he'd gladly help me sue if they refused. The staff training took place within three weeks.

    I'm also very outspoken when I encounter a fake team. At the counseling center to which I go for help, two other clients whose "service dogs" went absolutely thermonuclear in my (calm, well-behaved) dog's presence have been asked to leave their dogs at home until they've trained them to stop being reactive (lunging, whining, barking, snapping) towards other dogs. In addition, I educate those who are leery of my dog due to the terrible behavior of fakes. I've assured several taxi drivers that because jumping all over inside a cab is potentially dangerous because the dog could either distract the driver and cause an accident or injure him and others in the vehicle should there be an accident for any reason, he's within his legal rights to stop the cab and ask the handler to either bring their dog under control and have it safely lie on the floorboard or exit the vehicle. They are so relieved, as well as favorably impressed by my obedient, well-behaved partner.

    Well, I've rambled on too much. Many thanks to anyone who's read this far! LOL

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  17. I've noticed a couple of "thumbs" down on my views and hope those people understand the ramifications of a "fake" service dog.  They pose a real threat to trained service dogs in their behavior when they are in the vicinity of service dogs "working" as well as the frustration of the general public about having dogs in areas where they are ill-behaved and a nuisance. I cannot tell you the number of times I've been contacted because someone's "fake" service dog has bitten a handler's service dog or instigated a fight. Service dogs are NOT trained to be aggressive, and they will lose those battles every single time.  The rule is…if they show any aggression (to anything) during their training, they will be dropped from the program immediately.  
    Please know that my Lab, "Rocco" is a GREAT dog. He is a career-change dog from a service dog organization. Of all dogs in public, he would be fine, BUT he serves no purpose for me as a service dog; therefore, legally, he is not allowed in public places. Of course, I'd love him to accompany me, but the truth is, I don't want him distracting/interacting with a service dog when it's "working"….plain and simple.   

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  18. I have lupus and rheumatoid arthritis and degenerative osteo-arthritis in my spine and have a balance and mobility dog that helps with my balance issues because of meds/muscle problems and he helps me up from sitting with counterbalancing etc and retrieves things that I cant bend down to get on my bad days. There was a teacher at my university who had a "service dog" he would let the dog run around campus without him and at one point his dog ran up behind my SD and bit him. The university police and the university staff would do nothing because the guy worked there. I dont want to worry about vet bills from untrained dogs. I trained my own dog but it took 2 solid years of non-stop training, and the training never stops. I am always on the lookout for new things to expose my dog to. A trained service dog is trained to be able to learn, my dog has been exposed to so many situations that new ones dont bother him because he has been trained to respond a certain way. Shame on those people who fake it. They don't know what it is like to deal with pain or other disabilities day in and day out. I just think to myself, if you fake it, someday it might actually happen to you.

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  19. Okay, so you placed all emphasis on organization dogs. Well, what about owner-trained service dogs or owner-trains assisted by a private trainer? These service dogs are just as legitimate, and are covered by the ADA.
    I am almost finished training my service dog, and luckily my state gives owner-trainers access rights to all places of public accommodation. This dog performs her trained tasks, and I she is able to pass the PAT test with flying colors. She is a prime example of public access behavior a service dog needs to have. 
    I spend ~6 hrs training daily (my disability makes it to where I cannot go to school, nor work. so training is all I do

    Now, that I am an owner-trainer I have no other choice but to buy a vest from online. This video, along with others about banning online selling of vests would really put an obstacle on myself and other owner-trainers when needing to get proper equipment for their service dogs. 

    Most fakers/imposters can not properly answer the question "what tasks does your service dog perform". Perhaps, more education to the general public about owner trainers too? And businesses should be taught they can kick out a dog if it is misbehaving, such as intruding in on other people, barking, aggressive, etc…

    So, perhaps make a video on owner-trained service dogs? You are making it seem like the ONLY legit SDs come from schools. 

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  20. I wish there was something we could really do about fake service dogs. I have had my mobility/medical response SD nearly attacked 3 times in the last 6 months by fakers…

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  21. Great info! Could you maybe do a piece on different types of service dogs like asthma assistance dogs? My SDiT is going to be one but I cant find very much information on them

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  22. Now that I have the "serious" topic out of the way, more fun to come! Thanks so much for being a fan!!! 🙂

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  23. You're welcome! And again, I thank you for taking the time to share your experience on this and many other dog subjects! 🙂

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  24. Thanks so much Coleen for watching my blog and commenting!!! I am on a mission to get these "fake" service dogs off the street. They are dangerous on so many levels!

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  25. Thank you for taking the time to educate the public on this important topic Debbie, I appreciate it! 🙂

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